Field Dispatches

School in Nuba Mountains Bombed for Second Time

The Heiban Bible College, located in the Nuba Mountain region of Sudan, was bombed on March 23, 2014, for the second time in a little over a year. The Nuba Mountains, alongside the Blue Nile region, have been the staging ground for the conflict between the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N) rebel group and the government of Sudan for more than three years.  Read More »

Report: Taking Back Eastern Congo – Comprehensively Addressing the M23 and FDLR Rebel Groups

A new Enough Project field report analyzes the strength levels of two key rebel groups in eastern Congo and recommends political and security strategies for U.N. and U.S. leaders to pursue with the Congolese and Rwandan governments as part of a comprehensive peace process.  Read More »

Report: The Recent Fighting in Eastern Congo and Its Implications for Peace

A new Enough Project infographic and accompanying table reveals how the M23 rebel group and the Congolese national army – currently the two most powerful armed actors in eastern Congo - pursue their interests through a set of relationships with other armed groups.  Read More »

Field Dispatch: The Need for a Single Peace Process in Africa's Great Lakes Region

Today, the International Conference on the Great Lakes, or ICGLR, will host a Special Summit of the Great Lakes Region Heads of State and Government.  Read More »

Breaking News: Live Coverage from Eastern Congo

On July 14, 2013, Fighting resumed between M23 rebels and the Democratic Republic of Congo's army. This is the first fight after two months of peace. Enough Project field researcher Timo Mueller has been reporting live from the ground in Goma since Sunday, July 14, 2013.  Read More »

Report: Sudan's Bloody Periphery, The Toll on Civilians from the War in Blue Nile State

Report cover image

A new multimedia report and video produced for the Enough Project by Matthew LeRiche, and filmmaker Viktor Pesenti sheds light on the atrocities propagated by the government of Sudan in Blue Nile State as it combats the Sudan Revolutionary Front, or SRF.  Read More »

New Field Dispatch Highlights Attacks on Civilians in Sudan’s Blue Nile State

In a new Sudan field dispatch, “Refugees Provide Details of Attacks in Isolated Blue Nile State,” the Enough field team documents accounts of refugees fleeing violence in Sudan’s Blue Nile state. Refugees recounted the brutality of Sudan’s military tactic of targeting civilians as well as shed light on the reasons for the influx of nearly 35,000 refugees into South Sudan’s Upper Nile state over a three-week period from late May to early June.  Read More »

Field Dispatch: Is a Comprehensive Agreement for the Two Sudans Possible before August 2?

Today, July 5, representatives from Sudan and South Sudan recommenced negotiations in Addis Ababa following a week-long break for high level political consultations in Khartoum and Juba. A new Enough field dispatch, “A Comprehensive Agreement for the Two Sudans: Is It Possible?,” reviews the conversations that occurred during the last round of negotiations on the definition of the administrative common borderline, the modalities for determining the final definition of the north-south border, and the recent pace of the negotiation process.  Read More »

From the Frontline: Fighting between the Two Sudans Continues as SAF Launches Attack against SPLA in Unity State

BENTIU, South Sudan – On April 29, the 4th division of the Sudan People’s Liberation Army, or SPLA, operating around Panakuac—a South Sudanese town in northern Unity state, located about 23 kilometers away from Heglig where SPLA troops recently withdrew—came under attack from Sudan Armed Forces, or SAF.  I, along with a group of international journalists embedded within the 4th division, was caught in the crossfire.  Read More »

Sudan Dispatch: A View from Blue Nile

In his latest field dispatch, Enough Project field researcher Nenad Marinkovic reports on recent violence in Sudan’s Blue Nile state, including attacks from Sudanese military forces spanning from September 1 to November 3, which resulted in a prolonged destabilization of the region.  Read More »

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