Blog Posts in Sudan Now

Posted by Jenn Christian on Feb 3, 2012

On Thursday, South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir issued a press statement outlining the reasons why the government of the Republic of South Sudan, or RSS, recently rejected a deal ostensibly designed to avoid the complete shutdown of oil production in South Sudan. Kiir further stressed that lasting peace between Sudan and South Sudan will not be found in an agreement concerning oil alone, but, rather, must be built atop resolutions to outstanding issues related to the disputed Abyei area and the North-South border, in addition to the economic and oil concerns that have recently stalled negotiations between Sudan and the RSS.

Posted by Jenn Christian on Feb 3, 2012

On Thursday, South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir issued a press statement outlining the reasons why the government of the Republic of South Sudan, or RSS, recently rejected a deal ostensibly designed to avoid the complete shutdown of oil production in South Sudan. Kiir further stressed that lasting peace between Sudan and South Sudan will not be found in an agreement concerning oil alone, but, rather, must be built atop resolutions to outstanding issues related to the disputed Abyei area and the North-South border, in addition to the economic and oil concerns that have recently stalled negotiations between Sudan and the RSS.

Posted by Annie Callaway on Feb 3, 2012

With primary season well underway, a hardened pack of Republican presidential hopefuls has been in the spotlight for months debating everything from health care reform to moon colonies. Despite the wide range of topics bouncing around the various discussion forums, the acute humanitarian crises in Sudan and the Republic of South Sudan is something the candidates have not felt compelled to comment on. However, Mitt Romney, the current frontrunners, has recently taken the initiative to respond to a questionnaire sent out to all the candidates by the advocacy group Act for Sudan at the beginning of December.

Posted by Edward Ford on Feb 2, 2012

The Enough Project’s latest report, “Ensuring Success: Four Steps Beyond U.S. troops to End the War with the LRA,” outlines a comprehensive strategy for helping U.S. and African Union, or A.U., forces end the LRA and bring reconciliation to affected communities. Based on interviews in Uganda, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Washington, D.C., in December and January, this military and civilian focused approach is comprised of four specific strategies known collectively as TTID: increased special forces troop contributions, robust transportation options, enhanced intelligence capabilities, and renewed commitment to promoting the defections of LRA commanders and rank-and-file fighters.

Posted by Laura Heaton on Feb 2, 2012

Curious to see and hear the analysts working on Enough’s policy on South Sudan and Sudan? CNN and Al Jazeera recently featured Jenn Christian and Amanda Hsiao, two of Enough’s Sudan researchers, in prominent news broadcasts.